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Former Post-Doctoral Fellows Who Are Now PSU Faculty

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Amira Rose Davis, Ph.D.

Amira Rose Davis, Ph.D.

 

Johns Hopkins University, 2016

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Over the course of the fellowship year, Dr. Davis began revisions on her book manuscript: “Can’t Eat a Medal”: The Lives and Labors of Black Women Athletes in the Age of Jim Crow. She is also currently working on two forthcoming publications. The first is a journal article entitled, “The Right to Wear Silk: Black Womanhood and the Fisk Student Protests of 1925”. The second publication is a chapter about Michelle Cercey, a black teenager who served as a torchbearer for the 1977 International Women’s Conference in Houston, Texas. This piece will be included in an upcoming anthology in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of the political gathering and will document black women’s participation. In addition to participating in ARC Workshops Dr. Davis organized the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center’s annual Emerging Scholars Workshop and contributed to the Department of African American Studies’ Sawyer Seminar grant application to the Mellon Foundation. Dr. Davis gave invited talks on race, sports and activism at The University of Texas, Notre Dame University and Penn State University’s newly formed Center for the Study of Sports and Society. Dr. Davis also guest lectured in the following courses: The African American Woman, Social Movements in the United States, African American History, and Modern American History. She will present two papers at the upcoming Berkshire Conference on the History of Women, Gender and Sexualities. Recently, she was selected to participate in a NEH Summer Seminar on Gender and the State. Dr. Davis has accepted the position of Assistant Professor of History and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State.

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AnneMarie Mingo, Ph.D.

AnneMarie Mingo, Ph.D.

 

Religion

Emory University, 2013

Email:  axm583@psu.edu

AnneMarie Mingo has completed her Ph.D. in Ethics and Society in the Graduate Division of Religion at Emory University.  Her research interests include socio-religious activism of African American women and theological and ethical influences in social movements.  As an Africana Research Center post-doctoral fellow she will focus on revising her dissertation that develops a Lived theology and Liberative social ethic from the lived experiences of Black Churchwomen who were involved in the Civil Rights Movement. Her recent publication Restoring Rosewood: Movements from Pain to Power to Peace, appears in The Practical Matters Journal.  She is the recipient of many fellowships and awards including the Andrew W. Mellon Teaching Fellowship.  Dr. Mingo now serves as an Assistant Professor of African American Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State.

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Crystal Sanders, Ph.D.

Crystal Sanders, Ph.D.

 

History

Northwestern University, 2011

Email:  crs19@psu.edu

Dr. Sanders is a twentieth century United States historian with a particular interest in the African American freedom struggle in the U.S. South. She is currently working on a book manuscript based on her doctoral dissertation, which was entitled, "To Be Free of Fear: Black Women's Fight for Freedom Through the Child Development Group of Mississippi." In the book project, she considers how the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), a federal Head Start program for low-income preschoolers, produced a political battle between poor black mothers and grandmothers and white southern congressmen. Between 1965 and 1968, Mississippi's black working-class participants collaborated with the federal government to seek bottom-up change in the most repressive state in the country. They moved beyond teaching shapes and colors to challenge the state's closed political system and white supremacist ideology. Black women who had previously worked as sharecroppers and domestics now had significantly higher salaries as preschool teachers in jobs that provided them with the financial freedom to vote and send their children to previously all-white schools. Their challenge antagonized a white power structure, at both the local and state levels, that was unaccustomed to financially independent and assertive blacks. It provoked opposition that significantly diminished the transformative possibilities of Head Start and other War on Poverty programs.  Dr. Sanders now serves as an Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies at Penn State.

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Ariane Cruz, Ph.D.

Ariane Cruz, Ph.D.

 

African Diaspora Studies with a Designated Emphasis in Women Gender and Sexuality

University of California-Berkeley, 2010

Email:  auc21@psu.edu

Ariane Cruz received her B.A. from Stanford University with honors in Art Practice (Drawing and Painting) and African American Studies.  She received her M.A. from UC Berkeley in African Diaspora Studies.  She is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including the Ford Foundation Pre-Doctoral fellowship, and the UC Berkeley Center for the Study of Sexual Culture Dissertation Grant for her dissertation entitled “Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography.”  Her research and teaching interests include images of black female sexuality, black visuality and race and representation.  Dr. Cruz now serves as an Assistant Professor of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State.

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Kathryn Gines, Ph.D.

Kathryn Gines, Ph.D.

 

Philosophy

University of Memphis, 2003

Email:  ktg3@psu.edu

Professor Gines' primary research and teaching interests lie in Continental philosophy (especially Existentialism and Phenomenology), African American/Africana Philosophy, Black Feminist Philosophy, and Critical Philosophy of Race.  She has also taught in African American Studies/African Diaspora Studies.  Some of the major figures she writes about and teaches include Hannah Arendt, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Frantz Fanon,  Anna Julia Cooper and Richard Wright.  Professor Gines has published articles on race, assimilation, feminism, intersectionality, and sex and sexuality in contemporary hip-hop.  She  co-edited an anthology titled "Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy" (SUNY Press, 2010) and is author of "Hannah Arendt and the Negro Question" (Indiana University Press, 2014).  Professor Gines is the founding director of the Collegium of Black Women Philosophers (CBWP), the director of Cultivating Underrepresented Students in Philosophy (CUSP), and a founding co-editor of the journal Critical Philosophy of Race (CPR).  She is an active member of several professional organizations such as the American Philosophical Association, Society for Phenomenology and Existentialist Philosophy, Caribbean Philosophical Association, and Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora.  Married with four children she has a passion for empowering academics and professionals in the areas of work, life, and wellness balance.  The founding director of Work.Life.Wellness.Balance.Bliss, Gines offers workshops on work/life balance, academic balance, home balance, and wellness and self-care balance.  She is certified yoga instructor (RYT, 500 with an emphasis on yoga lifestyle teaching).  Dr. Gines is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Founding Director of the Collegium of Black Women Philosophers at Penn State.

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Gabeba Baderoon, Ph.D.

Gabeba Baderoon, Ph.D.

 

University of Cape Town, 2004

Email: gxb26@psu.edu

Gabeba Baderoon is the author of Regarding Muslims: from slavery to post-apartheid (Wits, 2014) and the poetry collections The Dream in the Next Body and A hundred silences. Shereceived a PhD in English from the University of Cape Town, and has held fellowships in the African Gender Institute, the Nordic Africa Institute, and the Centre for Contemporary Islam. Dr. Baderoon now serves as an Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and African Studies at Penn State, and an Extraordinary Professor of English at Stellenbosch University. She co-directs the African Feminist Initiative at Penn State with Alicia Decker.

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Shirley Moody-Turner, Ph.D.

Shirley Moody-Turner, Ph.D.

 

University of Maryland, 2006

Email: scm18@psu.edu

Shirley Moody-Turner came to Penn State University in 2006 as a post-doctoral fellow in the Africana Research Center before becoming an assistant professor in the department of English in 2007 and most recently, an associate professor of English and African American Studies. Specializing in African American literary and cultural studies, her work advances new perspectives on the interrelationships among folklore, discourses of race and gender, and the politics of African American and American literary and cultural productions.  She is most interested in recovering the innovative and resistant literary and ethnographic strategies African Americans have devised in efforts to engage, subvert, challenge, and/or rewrite the existing racialized and gendered protocols informing literary production and cultural representation. Her first monograph took up these concerns in relation to the field of folklore studies, while her second focuses in on African American print cultures.  She is the author of Black Folklore and the Politics of Racial Representation (University Press of Mississippi 2013) and co-editor of Contemporary African American Literature: The Living Canon (Indiana UP 2013). She recently signed on as editor of volume VII for the Cambridge University Press multi-volume series, African American Literature in Transition focusing on the years 1900-1910.  She serves on the editorial boards for Oxford Bibliographies Online and Resources in American Literary Study and has published and forthcoming articles and book chapters in African American Review, MELUS, MLA Approaches to Teaching Charles W. Chesnutt, Blackwell Companion to African American Literature, Blackwell Companion to American Literature, New Essays on the African American Novel, and Oxford Bibliographies Online. She is co-founder of the Anna Julia Cooper Society, president of the African American Literature and Culture Society, co-organizer of the Celebrating African American Literature conference series, and current director of Graduate Studies for the Department of African American Studies. Her work has been supported by numerous grants and fellowships, including a Ford Foundation Fellowship, a post-doctoral fellowship from Rutgers University, and Institute for Arts and Humanities Individual Faculty Grant, an Africana Research Center Travel Grant and a ational grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Her current project, tentatively titled,Privately Printing: Anna Julia Cooper and the Gender Politics of Black Publishing, recovers and critically examines Anna Julia Cooper’s innovative engagements with publishing and print cultures, thereby interrogating and expanding the parameters of what counts as African American literary production.  Dr. Moody-Turner now serves as an Associate Professor of English and African American Studies at Penn State.

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