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2007-2008 Fellows

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Gabeba Baderoon, Ph.D.

Gabeba Baderoon, Ph.D.

 

English

University of Cape Town, 2004

Email: gxb26@psu.edu

Gabeba Baderoon is the author of Regarding Muslims: From Slavery to Post-Apartheid (Wits, 2014) and the poetry collections The Dream in the Next Body and A Hundred Silences. She received the South African National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences Best Monograph award in 2017.  Dr. Baderoon received a Ph.D. in English from the University of Cape Town and has held fellowships in the African Gender Institute, the Nordic Africa Institute, and the Centre for Contemporary Islam. Dr. Baderoon is currently an Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and African Studies at Penn State, and an Extraordinary Professor of English at Stellenbosch University. She co-directs the African Feminist Initiative at Penn State with Alicia Decker.

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Dayo Mitchell, Ph.D.

Dayo Mitchell, Ph.D.

 

History

University of Virginia, 2005

Email:  dayom@stanford.edu

Dayo Nicole Mitchell is an Associate Director with Stanford Introductory Studies (SIS) (https://undergrad.stanford.edu/people/dayo-mitchell), under the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (VPUE). She works primarily with the Sophomore College program, and secondarily with Introductory Seminars. Both programs offer small classes for first- and second-year students to enhance their connection to Stanford. Sophomore College is a three-week residential program in September, where students concentrate on a single class in the block model. Before moving to SIS in 2016, Dayo served as an Academic Advising Director with Undergraduate Advising and Research (UAR), helping students of all majors and classes navigate Stanford, with a focus on helping freshmen and undeclared students find their academic home in a department

Dayo arrived at Stanford in 2011, after several years as faculty in the Clark Honors College at the University of Oregon. While at the honors college, she also developed experience with university admissions, undergraduate research, and diversity work, as well as doing general advising for honors college students across all majors and schools. Dayo is trained as a historian of slavery and the British empire in the Caribbean and taught courses in world history and the history of the Atlantic world. She has lived in California, New England, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Oregon, with extended stays abroad in England and Trinidad & Tobago. Her name is pronounced "DAH-yo", not "day-oh".

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Keisha-Khan Y. Perry, Ph.D.

Keisha-Khan Y. Perry, Ph.D.

 

Anthropology

University of Texas at Austin, 2005

Email:   

Keisha-Khan Y. Perry (Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, Anthropology, 2005) is Associate Professor of Africana Studies (https://vivo.brown.edu/display/kyperry) and specializes in the critical study of race, gender, and politics in the Americas with a particular focus on black women's activism, urban geography and questions of citizenship, feminist theories, intellectual history and disciplinary formations, and the interrelationship between scholarship, pedagogy, and political engagement. She has conducted extensive research in Mexico, Jamaica, Belize, Brazil, Argentina, and the United States.

Professor Perry recently completed Black Women against the Land Grab: The Fight for Racial Justice in Brazil which is an ethnographic study of black women's activism in Brazilian cities. The book examines their participation and leadership in neighborhood associations and how and in what ways their interpretations of racial and gender identities intersect with urban spaces. She is currently writing Anthropology for Liberation: Research, Writing and Teaching for Social Justice while working on two other research projects. She is engaged in a study which documents and analyzes the historical paradox of citizenship and black land ownership and loss in Brazil, Jamaica, and the United States. She is also working on a multi-lingual and transnational exploration of black women's political work in Latin America by critically examining how black women mobilize political movements across borders and how they understand themselves as agents in creating a diasporic community.

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