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2010-2011 Fellows

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Ikuko Asaka, Ph.D.

Ikuko Asaka, Ph.D.

 

History, Gender and Women’s History Program

University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2010

Email:  iasaka@illinois.edu

Dr. Asaka is a historian of the United States with an emphasis on the nineteenth century, empire, U.S. in the world, African American history, and women, gender and sexuality. Trained in U.S. and Japanese institutions, she has always taken comparative and transnational approaches in her study of history. In all of her work, she explores how race and its related processes—class, gender, and sexuality—organized and were organized by global structures and circumstances as well as by systems of exclusion and inclusion at national, colonial, and imperial levels.  Dr. Asaka is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (https://history.illinois.edu/directory/profile/iasaka). 

DISTINCTIONS / AWARDS

  • Lincoln Excellence for Assistant Professors Award, 2016-18
  • American Council of Learned Societies, New Faculty Fellowship, Women's and Gender Studies, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, 2012-13
  • Finalist, Gene Wise-Warren Susman Prize, American Studies Association, 2006


BOOKS

Tropical Freedom: Climate, Settler Colonialism, and Black Exclusion in the Age of Emancipation, Duke University Press 2017. 

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Lucretia Mott and the Underground Railroad: The Transatlantic World of a Radical American Woman, Journal of the Early Republic (forthcoming) Winter 2018.

Different Tales of John Glasgow: John Brown's Evolution to 'Slave Life in Georgia', Journal of Black Studies 49 3 2018, p. 212-234.

'Colored Men of the East': African Americans and the Instability of Race in US-Japan Relations, American Quarterly 66 42014, p. 971-997.

'Our Brethren in the West Indies’: Self Emancipated People in Canada and the Antebellum Politics of Diaspora and Empire, Journal of African American History 97 3 2012, p. 219-239.

BOOK CONTRIBUTIONS

Liberia and African American Migration across Anglophone Settler Colonial Empires Powering Up the Global: Taking U.S. History into Transimperial Terrain, Duke University Press 2019.

Exiles in America: Canadian Anti-Black Racism and the Meaning of Nation in the Age of the 1848 Revolutions Race and Nation in the Age of Emancipations (Race in the Atlantic World series), University of Georgia Press 2018.

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Jasmine Cobb, Ph.D.

Jasmine Cobb, Ph.D.

 

Communication

University of Pennsylvania, 2009

Email:  jasmine.cobb@duke.edu

Jasmine Nichole Cobb is the Bacca Foundation Associate Professor of African & African American Studies and of Art, Art History and Visual Studies at Duke University (https://aahvs.duke.edu/people/profile/jasmine-nichole-cobb). She earned a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and she is a recipient of the American Fellowship from the American Association of University Women (AAUW). She is the author of Picture Freedom:  Remaking Black Visuality in the Early Nineteenth Century (NYUP 2015), and the editor for African American Literature in Transition, Vol. 2 (Cambridge, forthcoming). She has written essays for MELUS:  Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United StatesAmerican Literary History and Public Culture and teaches courses on black visual culture and representation.

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Ariane Cruz, Ph.D.

Ariane Cruz, Ph.D.

 

African Diaspora Studies with a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender and Sexuality

University of California-Berkeley, 2010

Email:  auc21@psu.edu

Ariane Cruz is an Associate Professor in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State.  She holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in African Diaspora Studies with a Designated Emphasis in Women, Gender, and Sexuality.  Her manuscript, The Color of Kink: Black Women, BDSM, and Pornography, is in published with New York University Press (2016).   

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