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2012-2013 Fellows

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Jessie Dunbar, Ph.D.

Jessie Dunbar, Ph.D.

 

English

Emory University, 2012

Email:  

Jessie Dunbar completed her B.A. in English at Clark Atlanta University. She received her Master’s degree from the University of Georgia, where she completed a thesis entitled, “Tracing the Arc: Representations of Slave Children in History and Literature.”  Jessie holds a Ph.D. in English literature from Emory University.  Her research interests include nineteenth and twentieth century African American literature as well as Diaspora studies. She has been the recipient of a number of awards including the Graduate Research Opportunities Fellowship and the Laney Graduate School Diversity Fellowship. Jessie is revising her dissertation, “Democracy, Diaspora, and Disillusionment: Black Itinerancy and the Propaganda Wars,” for publication.  Dr. Dunbar is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Alabama-Birmingham (https://www.uab.edu/cas/english/people/faculty-directory/jessie-dunbar). 

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Jessica Johnson, Ph.D.

Jessica Johnson, Ph.D.

 

History

University of Maryland-College Park, 2012

Email:  jmj@jhu.edu 

Jessica Marie Johnson is an Assistant Professor in the Center Africana Studies and Department of History at the Johns Hopkins University (http://history.jhu.edu/directory/jessica-johnson/). Johnson is a historian of Atlantic slavery and the Atlantic African diaspora.

She is the author of Practicing Freedom: Black Women, Intimacy, and Kinship in New Orleans Atlantic World (University of Pennsylvania Press, under contract). She is co-editor with Dr. Mark Anthony Neal (Duke University) of Black Code: A Special Issue of the Black Scholar (2017). Her work has appeared in Slavery & Abolition, The Black Scholar, Meridians: Feminism, Race and Transnationalism, Debates in the Digital Humanities, Bitch Magazine, Black Perspectives (AAIHS), and #DHPoco: Postcolonial Digital Humanities. She is the recipient of research fellowships and awards from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Library Company of Philadelphia, the Gilder-Lehrman Institute, the Richards Civil War Era Center, and the Africana Research Center at the Pennsylvania State University.

As a digital humanist, Johnson explores ways digital and social media disseminate and create historical narratives, in particular, comparative histories of slavery and people of African descent. She is the founder of African Diaspora, Ph.D. (africandiasporaphd.com), co-organizer of the Queering Slavery Working Group with Dr. Vanessa Holden (University of Kentucky), a member of the LatiNegrxs Project (lati-negros.tumblr.com), and a Digital Alchemist at the Center for Solutions to Online Violence (http://femtechnet.org/csov/).

Read more about her work here: http://jmjohnso.com. Find her on social media here: @jmjafrx.

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Sabrina Strings, Ph.D.

Sabrina Strings, Ph.D.

 

Sociology

University of California-San Diego, 2012

Email:  

Sabrina Strings has a B.A. with High Honors in Psychology from University of California-Berkeley and an M.A. in Sociology from University of California-San Diego. She received her Ph.D. from University of California-San Diego. Her research examines the co-construction blackness and whiteness vis à vis the discourse surrounding "racially appropriate" female bodies from the Enlightenment through the early 20th century. Dr. Strings is a former McNair Scholar and has received several awards for her research from the African and African American Studies Research Center, as well as the Ujima Network. She has served as a UC President’s Dissertation Year fellow, and is a member of the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. Since completing the ARC postdoctoral fellowship, she served as a UC Berkeley Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow from 2013-2015. She is also a 2017-2018 Hellman Fellow.  Her first book, Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia, is forthcoming with NYU Press (March 2019).  Dr. Strings is currently an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of California-Irvine (https://www.sociology.uci.edu/people/faculty.php). 

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William Sturkey, Ph.D.

William Sturkey, Ph.D.

 

African-American History

Ohio State University, 2012

Email:  wsturkey@live.unc.edu

William Sturkey is an historian of Modern America who specializes in the history of race in the American South, with a particular interest in the histories of working-class racial minorities. He is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (http://history.unc.edu/people/lecturers-and-post-doctoral-fellows/william-sturkey/) and teaches courses on Modern American History, Southern History, the Civil Rights Movement, and the History of America in the 1960s.  His first book, To Write in the Light of Freedom, is a co-edited collection of newspapers, essays, and poems produced by African American Freedom School students during the Mississippi Freedom Summer of 1964. His second book, Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White, is a biracial history of Southern Jim Crow that will be published by Harvard University Press in the Spring of 2019. Dr. Sturkey is currently working on a new project, tentatively titled To Be An American, which is a biography of the legendary Vietnam War hero Master Sergeant Roy Benavidez.

Dr. Sturkey works with graduate students in all fields of Modern American History. He is currently advising the talented Jennifer Standish and Laura Woods. Dr. Sturkey also serves on the Faculty Advisory Board of the UNC Center for the Study of the American South and the UNC Program in the Humanities. He also serves an elected representative on the UNC Faculty Athletics Council. During the 2017-2018 academic year, he was named one of two faculty recipients of the university-wide UNC Diversity and Inclusion Award for “significant contribution, time and effort of Carolina community members towards advancing an inclusive climate for excellence in teaching, research, public service and academic endeavor.” Dr. Sturkey is also an engaged public scholar who regularly gives public lectures, appears in local and national media, and works with K-12 teachers.

Some Notable Publications

  • Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White (Harvard University Press, scheduled for publication in Spring of 2019)
  • Co-editor with Jon Hale, To Write in the Light of Freedom: The Newspapers of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools(Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2015)
  • “Race and Reconciliation on the Gulf & Ship Island Railroad,” forthcoming in Southern Cultures.
  • “‘Crafts of Freedom:’ The Poor People’s Corporation and Working-Class African American Women’s Activism for Black Power,” The Journal of Mississippi History, Vol. LXXIV, No. 1 (Spring 2012): 25–60
  • “‘I Want to Become Part of History:’ Freedom Summer, Freedom Schools, and the Freedom News,” The Journal of African American History, Vol. 95, No. 3 & 4 (Summer/Fall 2010): 348–368, Special Issue on “Black Print Culture”

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