You are here: Home / History / Who We Are / Post-Doctoral Fellows / 2013-2014 Fellows

2013-2014 Fellows

Up one level
AnneMarie Mingo, Ph.D.

AnneMarie Mingo, Ph.D.

 

Religion

Emory University, 2013

Email:  axm583@psu.edu

AnneMarie Mingo is an Assistant Professor in African American Studies and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Penn State.  She received her BS in Business Administration from Florida A&M University; MBA from Rollins College; M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary; and Ph.D. in Ethics and Society at Emory University.  Her dissertation was entitled “Black Churchwomen’s Lived Theology and Liberative Social Ethics during the Civil Rights Movement,” in which she constructed a theology and ethic from oral histories gathered from Black religious women who were active in the Movement. Her research interests include 20thCentury Black Freedom Struggles with a specific focus on the U.S. Civil Rights Movement and South African Apartheid Movement, socio-religious activism of Black women, and theological and ethical influences in social movements. She also writes in areas of Black Church activism, peace and reconciliation, and the influence of Black music and media on social activism.

Read More…

Sasha D. Turner Bryson, Ph.D.

Sasha D. Turner Bryson, Ph.D.

 

History

University of Cambridge, UK, 2008

Email:  

In Fall 2013, Dr. Turner completed her book manuscript, Contested Bodies: Pregnancy, Childbirth, Childrearing, and Slavery in Jamaica, 1780-1834. The project, which is not a revised dissertation, benefitted from reviews from external specialists in the study of gender, slavery, and the Caribbean during her book workshop. The manuscript was revised for submission to press in Spring 2014. Her article, “The art of power: Poison and Obeah accusations and the struggle for dominance and survival in Jamaica’s slave society” was published in the Fall 2013 volume of Caribbean Studies. Currently, she is completing an article titled, “Demystifying the mysterious and uncanny: Witchcraft as an interpretative framework for decoding Obeah and other unnamed mysteries among slaves in Jamaica”, which was accepted for publication in Caribbean Quarterly. Dr. Turner is working on her second book that explores emergent ideas and anxieties about beauty and bodily ideals in the period of British colonization and how they shaped the construction and performance of white womanhood. She is working on an article that examines white women’s negotiation of colonial gendered expectations that complicated their efforts to secure property rights and economic participation. During the fellowship year, she also presented parts of her work at the Biennial Conference of the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora and the Berkshire Conference on the History of Women. Dr. Turner is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Quinnipiac University (https://www.qu.edu/student-resources/directory/staff.53880.html).

Read More…

Michael Woldemariam, Ph.D.

Michael Woldemariam, Ph.D.

 

Politics

Princeton University, 2011

Email:  mwoldema@bu.edu

Michael Woldemariam’s teaching and research interests focus on African politics, particularly the dynamics of armed conflict, the behavior of rebel organizations and self-determination movements, and post-conflict institution building. He has special expertise on the Horn of Africa region, where he has travelled extensively and conducted fieldwork.

His first book, Insurgent Fragmentation in the Horn of Africa: Rebellion and its Discontents, was released by Cambridge University Press in 2018. It examines the causes and dynamics of rebel fragmentation in contemporary civil wars through a close examination of the Ethiopian and Somali conflicts. Research on this topic and others has been published (or is forthcoming) in Terrorism and Political Violence, the Journal of Strategic Studies, Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, Journal of Eastern African Studies, and a number of edited volumes.

Woldemariam has been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the Bradley Foundation, the Truman National Security Project, and a research specialist with the Innovations for Successful Societies program at Princeton University.

In addition to his scholarly work, Woldemariam has consulted with a variety of international organization’s on peace and security issues in the Greater Horn of Africa region.

Dr. Woldemariam is currently an Assistant Professor of International Relations and Political Science at Boston University (https://www.bu.edu/pardeeschool/profile/michael-woldemariam/). 

Read More…