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2015-2016 Fellows

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Juli Grigsby, Ph.D.

Juli Grigsby, Ph.D.

 

Cultural Anthropology African Diaspora program

University of Texas at Austin, 2014

Email:  jgrigsby@haverford.edu

Juli Grigsby is an U.S. based Anthropologist.  Her areas of expertise include critical race theory, feminist and queer theory, urban ethnography, violence, women’s health and U.S Social Movements.  The past recipient of Davis Putter Fellowships and a Humanities, Arts, Science, Technology & Advanced Collaboratory Scholar (HASTAC) her photographic work has appeared in the Black California Dreamin’ journal and at the Metro Art Gallery in Pomona, California.  Her current book project is Grim Sleeper: Gender, Violence, and Reproductive Justice in Los Angeles, which explores black women’s experiences of structural violence and black women’s commitment to social transformation through reproductive justice.

Dr. Grigsby is currently an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Haverford College (https://www.haverford.edu/users/jgrigsby).

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Aditi Malik, Ph.D.

Aditi Malik, Ph.D.

 

Political Science

Northwestern University, 2015

Email:  amalik@holycross.edu

Aditi Malik is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the College of the Holy Cross (https://www.holycross.edu/academics/programs/political-science/faculty/aditi_malik).  Her current research examines the relationship between projected party lifespans and elites' incentives to instrumentalize election-related violence. She investigates this question in two developing democracies--Kenya and India--where she has conducted extensive fieldwork. Substantively, she is interested in the study of political parties, political violence, and ethnic politics in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Her research on these topics has appeared or is forthcoming in Human Rights ReviewHuman Rights QuarterlyAfrican Conflict and Peacebuilding ReviewTransitional Justice Review, and Commonwealth and Comparative Politics.  She has also conducted policy analysis for the World Bank and the United Nations. 


She earned her Ph.D. in Political Science from Northwestern University, her MPhil in International Relations from the University of Cambridge, and her B.A. in Government and Economics from Franklin & Marshall College. Prior to arriving at Holy Cross, she taught at California State University, San Marcos and served as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Africana Research Center at Penn State.

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Nicole Myers Turner, Ph.D.

Nicole Myers Turner, Ph.D.

 

History

University of Pennsylvania, 2013

Email:  nmturner@vcu.edu

Nicole Myers Turner’s current research project explores how Virginia’s free and freed people used their churches, conventions and religious educational institutions to define political strategies, gender roles and community membership. The study delves deeply into the limited but extant records of black religious institutions and incorporates GIS mapping techniques to visualize the church and political networks that supported black participation in electoral politics. Through this local study, that incorporates examination of election data, church membership records, and religious networks she offers a social and political history of late-nineteenth century black religion.  Her other research and teaching interests include African American religious history, black transnational religious and political networks, women and gender in history. She teaches courses that explore the intersections of race, gender and class in the African American experience including the African American history survey, and courses on Jim Crow America.  She is also interested in the growth and potential of digital humanities for expanding the explanatory power of historical research.  

Dr. Turner is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Virginia Commonwealth University (https://history.vcu.edu/people/turner.html). 

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