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Former Fellow Spotlights

Michael KehindeMichael Kehinde

ARC Postdoctoral Fellow for 2011-2012

 

1. Where (on or off campus) did you work most efficiently during your ARC postdoctoral year? 

I worked best in my campus office.

2. How did the ARC postdoc advance your scholarly and/or professional goals? 

The ARC fellowship expanded my professional work and positioned me for my next challenge.

3. What is one personal hobby you have that might surprise or interest others? 

A favorite hobby is swimming with my wife and three daughters.

Dr. Michael Kehinde is a Cabinet Policy Resident in Toronto Canada.  His publications include a book, Democratic Governance and Political Participation in Nigeria, 1999-2014 (Denver, CO: Spears Media Press, 2016) and an entry on the "Trans-Saharan Slave Trade" in the Encyclopedia of Migration.

 

 

 

 

Jasmine Cobb

Jasmine Cobb

ARC Postdoctoral Fellow for 2010-2011

 

1. Where (on or off campus) did you work most efficiently during your ARC postdoctoral year? 

I don't really remember where I worked.  I believe I worked in the ARC and in the library.

2. How did the ARC postdoc advance your scholarly and/or professional goals? 

The ARC fellowship helped advance my career through the great professional development workshops and the opportunities to connect with Penn State faculty.

3. What is one personal hobby you have that might surprise or interest others? 

A favorite hobby is cooking, which was fun to do in Happy Valley.

Dr. Jasmine Cobb is the Bacca Foundation Associate Professor of African & African American Studies and Art, Art History and Visual Studies at Duke University.  She is the author of Picture Freedom: Remaking Black Visuality in the Early Nineteenth Century (NYU Press 2015).  Dr. Cobb lives in Durham, NC and has one son.

 

 

 

 

Erin ChapmanErin Chapman

ARC Postdoctoral Fellow for 2005-2006

 

1. Where (on or off campus) did you work most efficiently during your ARC postdoctoral year? 

When I was at Penn State, I definitely worked most efficiently off campus. I rarely used the office I was loaned in the History Department, but I occasionally worked at the library. 

2. How did the ARC postdoc advance your scholarly and/or professional goals? 

The ARC fellowship allowed me the time and support I needed to finish my dissertation and to confidently enter the academic job market. I also met valuable contacts such as Nan Woodruff and Lori Ginzberg. 

3. What is one personal hobby you have that might surprise or interest others? 

One hobby that would likely surprise most is my love of the Marvel Comics movies. I never miss an Avengers movie. From Thor to the Black Panther, I've seen them all! And my favorite Avenger is Iron Man.

Dr. Erin D. Chapman is an Associate Professor of History at George Washington University.  She teaches survey courses in African American history and graduate and undergraduate seminars on African American historiography, African American historical biography, the history of American slavery and its legacies, and U.S. black radicalism.

She is the author of Prove It On Me: New Negroes, Sex, and Popular Culture in the 1920s (published by Oxford University Press in 2012) and a range of book chapters and articles. These include “Staging Gendered Radicalism at the Height of the U.S. Cold War: A Raisin in the Sun and Lorraine Hansberry’s Vision of Freedom,” published in the journal Gender & History in August of 2017 and “Rape Fantasies and Other Assaults: Black Women’s Sexuality and Racial Redemption on Film,” which is Chapter 10 in the collection Black Female Sexualities, edited by Trimiko Melancon and Joanne M. Braxton and published by Rutgers University Press in 2015.

 

 

 

 

Gabeba BaderoonGabeba Baderoon

ARC Postdoctoral Fellow for 2007-2008

 

1. Where (on or off campus) did you work most efficiently during your ARC postdoctoral year? 

I worked very well on campus in my office and also at Websters bookstore, as well as in my home office.

2. How did the ARC postdoc advance your scholarly and/or professional goals? 

The ARC postdoc was the beginning of the academic career in the U.S. and its seminars inducted me into the intellectual culture as well as the intricacies of the U.S. academy. Even more importantly, the ARC introduced me to many of my dearest friends, many of whom are still my closest confidants today. With the women I met at the ARC, I saw that we could collectively create forums and venues that could nourish and sustain us and also change the academy.

3. What is one personal hobby you have that might surprise or interest others? 

I have recently started drawing again, something I had briefly dipped into in the 1990s but left behind when I began focusing on my studies.  Now that I've turned back to drawing, I've found that it energizes me and allows me to see and be in the world in completely new ways.  It's taught me that it's really important to have a part of your life that is not devoted to reading, writing and critical thinking and instead draws on the body and undirected creativity.

Dr. Baderoon completed her ARC Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2008. Since that time, she had attained tenure at Penn State in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and African Studies.  Her first book, Regarding Muslims: From Slavery to Post-Apartheid, which she began during her ARC fellowship, was published in 2014 and received the South African National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences Best Monograph award in 2017.

Sabrina Strings

Sabrina Strings

ARC Postdoctoral Fellow for 2012-2013

 

1. Where (on or off campus) did you work most efficiently during your ARC postdoctoral year? 

I work best from home, so my work location was Toftrees.

2. How did the ARC postdoc advance your scholarly and/or professional goals? 

The ARC fellowship exposed me to some of the most incredible scholars of Black history in the country. Allison Blakely and Robin D.G. Kelley to name a few. It introduced me to new research and perspectives that broadened the scope of my work, making it more interdisciplinary. The fellowship was a beautifully enriching experience.

3. What is one personal hobby you have that might surprise or interest others? 

Watching Pose!!

Dr. Strings completed her ARC Postdoctoral Fellowship in 2013. Since that time, she was a University of California-Berkeley Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellow from 2013-2015.  She has been an Assistant Professor at University of California-Irvine since 2015 and is a 2017-2018 Hellman Fellow. 

Dr. Strings first book, Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia, is forthcoming with NYU Press (March 2019).



William Sturkey

William Sturkey

ARC Postdoctoral Fellow for 2012-2013

 

1. Where (on or off campus) did you work most efficiently during your ARC postdoctoral year?

My office in 130C Willard Building.

2. How did the ARC postdoc advance your scholarly and/or professional goals?

The postdoc was one of the most valuable experiences of my professional life. I learned a great deal attending the workshops and seminars and completed my first book, a co-edited volume about the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools (http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1974). I also made significant progress toward revising my dissertation, which is scheduled for publication in the spring of 2019 with Harvard University Press.

3. What is one personal hobby you have that might surprise or interest others?

I played baseball throughout my entire youth and adolescence and love Major League Baseball.

Dr. Sturkey has served as an Assistant Professor of History at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill since 2015.  He is the co-editor of To Write in the Light of Freedom: The Newspapers of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools (Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2015), which he worked on this during his ARC fellowship year.  Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White is due to be published by Harvard University Press in spring of 2019. He spent most of his fellowship year working on this monograph.  Dr. Sturkey has also published four contributions to the African American Intellectual History Society blog, Black Perspectives.  During this past 2017-2018 academic year, he was one of two recipients of the UNC Faculty Diversity Award among a faculty of over 3,500 (https://diversity.unc.edu/programs/awards/#The_2018_Recipients_of_the_Diversity_Awards).